Best Bass Fishing Rods For Beginners

How do you decide which rod is the best for you?

Have you ever wondered if maybe that was a bite or just the bottom?  I know I have a few times!

It was until recently that I learned the rod I was fishing with was the reason; I could not tell the difference.  

Did you ever wonder why there are so many fishing rods in the section? … How do you decide which rod is the best for you?

I am here to tell you just some of the basics of choosing your next bass fishing rod.  

There are two main types of rods, which can be broken down into many more multiple subgroups.

You can have a spinning rod, that pairs with an open faced or spinning reel and the other option is a bait-casting rod.

Each rod has its place and time when fishing. We will break them down later in this article.  So, when deciding on your next rod where do you begin to look?

The Specs

After deciding the type of rod we need to tackle the length question, how long or short do you want for a rod?  There are specific times when you want or need shorter or longer rods and we will get into that later. 

As for me personally, I prefer a seven-foot rod for most of my applications.  It really allows me to get a good cast, a stronger hookset, and excellent control of the fish when hooked. In addition, by having most rods the same length, I have an easier time adjusting to those aforementioned benefits.  

However, I have had some instances when I wished my rod was a little shorter, still not sure how I ended up under that tree that day on the shore, but it did cost me a nice rod when it broke on the low branch. Oops! 

The next important thing to consider is the power rating.

The Power

Have you heard the person in the fishing section talking about how they “set the hook with their extra heavy jig rod and the monster didn’t even budge”?   

Most likely because he just hooked a stump, but let us focus on the “extra heavy” part of the jig rod. Fishing rod manufacturers separate rods by the power, for example ultra-light, light, medium, medium-heavy, heavy, extra-heavy.  

These designations represent the strength of the rod. This information can usually be found written on the rod near the handle and use abbreviations like UL, L, M, MH, H, XH. 

Along with the power rating, you have to think about the action of the tip.

Photo cred: Project Z-man

"Tip Action"

“Tip-Action” will vary from rod to rod and manufacturer to manufacturer, however a “fast action tip” is just that.  

There are a few different types of action to rods. This action refers to how much movement the tip of the road has.  

Most basic actions are medium, fast, and extra fast

Each action has a different purpose, for example if I was fishing a finesse bait on light line, I would want a fast to extra fast tip to help set the hook without putting too much pressure on the line itself. I had the fun experience of learning this lesson a few times during some tournaments, when I tried to set the hook too hard.  

The action also helps in the motion of the lure in certain circumstances… 

Throwing a jerk bait might be better suited on a fast action rod rather than a medium action tip. 

So now that we have covered some of the “basics” of rods, it is time to get into the nitty gritty of technique specific rods.

Photo cred: Project Z-man

Spinning Rods

Most spinning rods are designed for more of a finesse approach to fishing, yes they do make and sell monster spinning rods; those are usually for saltwater or catfishing.  

Bass spinning rods are usually between six feet and seven feet for length and have the power rating of medium or less. The action is most likely fast or extra fast, but occasionally medium.  

Spinning rods are made for light line, light lures and finesse tactics. They are mostly ultra-sensitive and you can feel almost everything with them. So these are typically used for drop shot, weightless stick baits, top water floating worms, which all serve a great purpose when bass fishing.  

I personally always carry at least one spinning rod when I am out fishing; it is a seven-foot, medium power with a fast action tip. 

The manufacturers designed it as a drop shot rod, which is what I usually throw on it; however, I have thrown a light ned rig, or a stick bait on it with success as well.  

Now, as far as bait-casting rods go there are far more options.

Casting Rods

There are so many different technique specific rods in the bait-casting type, I could almost write an entire other article on it, however for your sanity and mine, I will limit it to a few paragraphs and just make sure you get the basics of it.  

The most used rod type would be a crankbait or reaction rod. 

Crankbait bass fishing rods are usually made from graphite or fiberglass, Fiberglass has a usually more moderate or slower action to it. Fiberglass rods are heavier and less sensitive though, they can wear out your arm or shoulder throwing it all day.  

Graphite rods allow for more sensitivity and weigh far lighter than fiberglass, which helps when you are throwing it around a lot searching for those bass. I prefer slightly longer rods for reaction baits, it allows me to cast further and I want to cover more water when fishing reaction baits to help me locate the schools of fish.  

My reaction rod is a seven foot six inch graphite rod with a moderate action tip and medium power. It works great for me when I throw shallow to medium diving crankbaits, spinnerbaits, and chatter baits. 

Another rod I use a lot is my Jig rod, it is versatile in the sense I can throw jigs, and worms on multiple rigs on it.

Photo cred: advancedangler.com photo by Alan McGuckin / Dynamic

Jig Rods

Most jig rods are separate in the fact they are a little heavier power, a little longer, and fast action tips.  That makes an interesting combination, they use the length to help move the jig/worm by raising the tip. The longer the rod the more line you move when you raise the tip.  

You need the heavier power, either heavy or extra heavy, to help get the big hooks used with jigs and worms through the fishes mouth in all that cover you normally throw them in.  The last most important part is the fast action tip, without this, you will not be able to feel those bites in order to set those hooks. 

There are a few other techniques worth mentioning like top-water, and big swimbaits, that each have a specific rod style associated with them.  

Topwater and Swimbait Rods

Top-water rods are usually shorter, medium, to medium heavy power, with an extra fast action tip.  

Those that choose the big swimbait bite, well your looking into some giant rods. Most are over seven foot six inches, heavy power with a fast action tip.  

You need the heavier power, either heavy or extra heavy, to help get the big hooks used with jigs and worms through the fishes mouth in all that cover you normally throw them in.  The last most important part is the fast action tip, without this, you will not be able to feel those bites in order to set those hooks. 

There are a few other techniques worth mentioning like top-water, and big swimbaits, that each have a specific rod style associated with them.  

Overall, if you were looking for some new bass rods I would recommend getting a good spinning rod, a reaction rod and a good worm/jig rod. You can pretty much fish most techniques with those 3 rods successfully.  

If you are like most of us bass anglers, once you land a few bass, you will be hooked. Then in no time at all, you will have one or two of every technique specific rod out there. I hope I was able to help you or maybe just entertain you and look forward to hearing your input back.  

Good Luck ya’ll!

Jason

>>> Click Here for the Best Bass Spinning Rods For The Money 2019

>>> Click Here for the Best Baitcasting Rods For The Money 2019

>>> Best Bass Reels for Beginners – CLICK HERE

About The Author – A newly married paramedic by trade loves to spend his free time fishing and filming for this YouTube Channel Loud Mouth Bassin’. Jason has been fishing for over 30 years thanks to his father. Jason is also a dedicated tournament angler fishing with several bass club.  Holding nothing back, Jason loves to share all of his tips and lessons to make you more successful on the water.

Check out his channel here:  Loud Mouth Bassin’.

Jason Stanton

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