20 Secrets To Vertical Jigging A Spoon For Stubborn Winter Bass

How to fish a spoon for winter largemouth bass by vertical jigging.

You should only pop the spoon off the bottom about a foot. Now slowly follow the spoon back down to the bottom with just a little bow in the line.  Remember… you always want a little bit of slack in the line.”

If there is one time of year that can be the most frustrating time to fish, without a doubt will be winter fishing.   Gone are the days of raw and torn up “bass thumb”, catching fish after fish, or insane topwater action. What it’s replaced with is a frigid and often undesirable realization that the bass are incredibly lethargic, the skies are dark, the wind stings, and the water is colder than my ex-girlfriend.  

But WAIT!

Don’t winterize your boat yet!  There’s still fishing to be done!

How you ask?  We’ll show you…

Today we’ll go over an often overlooked technique that many anglers will snicker at… Vertically jigging spoons for winter bass.

Using some simple but tried and true strategies, you can easily learn how to vertically jig for winter bass. No special equipment needed. Check out the simple tutorial, from FatherreeFishing, below.

As you’ll quickly learn this is an absolutely great way to catch bass in the winter time.

First thing you’ll observe, is winter bass will follow schools of bait in order to feed all winter.

Typically, bass will set themselves up offshore, so you better focus on main lake humps, points, or flattened areas that have creeks channels.

Submerged main lake islands are also a great location to find winter bass.

When you start to look at your electronics while you are idling over these locations, you’re going to look for mainly two different layers of fish.
When you start to look at your electronics while you are idling over these locations, you’re going to look for mainly two different layers of fish. The majority of the time the bait fish will be about halfway down in the water column, and the bass will be will be the larger marks below the schools of bait fish. The reason why they’re hanging out underneath the schools of shad is the bass are waiting for the struggling and dying baitfish to flutter down. PRO TIP:  Try to use the heaviest spoon the bass will bite.  Reason for this is once you turn on a feeding frenzy with school of bass that you’re targeting you need to get that spoon down to that as fast as possible. If you’re using a light  ½-ounce spoon it’s going to take forever to slowly flutter its way down to the school. Whereas, if you use a heavy 1 ½-ounce spoon, you could be catching bass lightning fast because the weight of the spoon will get to the bass in record time.

Depending on the depth of the lake, typically you’ll need  ½-ounce to 2-ounce spoon is recommended.

On bright and sunny days, use shiny colors such as chrome or gold colored spoons.

If there is overcast, then go with a bright white spoon.

PRO TIP: It really doesn’t matter what spoon you use, just as long it has a good flutter down to the bottom.  

You can set up and regular spoons several different ways.

First, you can tie directly on the split ring that is a patch to the top of the spoon.

Second, you can add a swivel to the split ring and tie your line onto the swivel. The swivel helps to avoid any unnecessary spinning in the line which avoids any line tangling.

Lastly, thread your line through the line tie and tie off a separate treble hook. This will give you a second hook to catch those bass that will only attack the head of a spoon.

Lastly, you can thread your line through the line tie and tie off a separate treble hook. This will give you a second hook to catch those bass that will only attack the head of a spoon.

When you find your fish, drop your spoon directly down beneath your boat and let that spoon fall all the way to the bottom.

Once it hits bottom, turn the rod sideways and grab the top section of the reel seat. This avoids any wrist and arm fatigue, so you can avoid any unnecessary injuries.

Then engage your reel and give it a pop.

You should only pop the spoon off the bottom about a foot. Now slowly follow the spoon back down to the bottom with just a little bow in the line.  Remember, you always want a little bit of slack in the line.

Eventually the bass will tell you how they want the bait presented.

If they don’t want a single pop, sometimes they will want you to lift it up and shake it a little bit and then drop it back down period or other times they will respond if you let it fall to the bottom shake it on the bottom and then just dead stick it for a few seconds.

The bass will bite the spoon almost always as it’s falling.

Never allow your line to straighten because it will give the spoon a very unnatural appearance.

You also never want too much slack in the line, then you’ll never detect when the bass bite.

There are many types of retrieves you just have to test to see which variation they want the most.

A shorter rod is best for this type of technique. A 6-6 medium heavy power rod with a fast-action tip is perfect. St. Croix Avid series rods are phenomenal for this type of technique. And they are made in the USA.

You definitely want to match this up with 14 to 17 pound fluorocarbon line.

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